Top 5 Features in the Paris Release

This year’s Paris release is full of great new functionality and updates to the ServiceNow platform. Needless to say, there were a ton of features to cover, so instead of compiling an enormous list, I’ve put together this video of my personal top 5 features. I bet at least a couple of these will surprise you! Check out the video. Let me know in the comments below if you agree or if you feel there is a big feature that should have made the list. The official release notes can be found here: https://docs.servicenow.com/bundle/paris-release-notes/page/release-notes/family-release-notes.html

UI Bootstrap in Service Portal

UI Bootstrap in Service Portal You may already be familiar with the $uibModal service in Service Portal, but did you know there is a whole library of useful directives and services available in UI Bootstrap?  UI Bootstrap is a client-side library of Bootstrap components written in AngularJS and contains 20 directives that offer a consistent framework, responsive design, and cross-browser compatibility when developing in Service Portal. Although UI Bootstrap is considered feature-complete and is no longer being maintained, Service Portal currently includes UI Bootstrap version 1.1.2. Here are the UI Bootstrap directives. Accordion (ui.bootstrap.accordion) The accordion directive builds on top of the collapse directive to provide a list of items, with collapsible bodies that are collapsed or expanded by clicking on the item’s header. Alert (ui.bootstrap.alert) This directive can be used both to generate alerts from static and dynamic model data (using the ng-repeat directive). Buttons (ui.bootstrap.buttons) With the buttons directive, we can make a group of buttons behave like a set of checkboxes (uib-btn-checkbox) or behave like a set of radio buttons (uib-btn-radio). Carousel (ui.bootstrap.carousel) Carousel creates a carousel similar to bootstrap’s image carousel. Collapse (ui.bootstrap.collapse) Resize window to less than 768 pixels to display mobile menu toggle button. Dateparser (ui.bootstrap.dateparser) The uibDateParser is what the uib-datepicker uses internally to parse the dates. You can use it standalone by injecting the uibDateParser service where you need it. Datepicker (ui.bootstrap.datepicker) The datepicker is flexible and fully customizable. You can navigate through days, months and years. Dropdown (ui.bootstrap.dropdown) Dropdown is a simple directive that will toggle a dropdown menu on click or programmatically. Modal (ui.bootstrap.modal) $uibModal is a service to create modal windows. Creating modals is straightforward: create a template and controller, and reference them when using $uibModal. Pager (ui.bootstrap.pager) A lightweight pager directive that is focused on providing previous/next paging functionality. Pagination (ui.bootstrap.pagination) A lightweight pagination directive that is focused on providing pagination & will take care of visualizing a pagination bar and enable/disable buttons correctly! Popover (ui.bootstrap.popover) A lightweight, extensible directive for fancy popover creation. The popover directive supports multiple placements, optional transition animation, and more. Position (ui.bootstrap.position) The $uibPosition service provides a set of DOM utilities used internally to absolute-position an element in relation to another element (tooltips, popovers, typeaheads etc…). Progressbar (ui.bootstrap.progressbar) A progress bar directive that is focused on providing feedback on the progress of a workflow or action. Rating (ui.bootstrap.rating) Rating directive that will take care of visualizing a star rating bar. Tabs (ui.bootstrap.tabs) AngularJS version of the tabs directive. Timepicker (ui.bootstrap.timepicker) A lightweight & configurable timepicker directive. Tooltip (ui.bootstrap.tooltip) A lightweight, extensible directive for fancy tooltip creation. The tooltip directive supports multiple placements, optional transition animation, and more. Typeahead (ui.bootstrap.typeahead) Typeahead is an AngularJS version of Bootstrap v2’s typeahead plugin. This directive can be used to quickly create elegant typeaheads with any form text input. Check out the full UI Bootstrap documentation here: https://angular-ui.github.io/bootstrap/ How have you used the UI  Bootstrap directives in your Service Portal projects? Let me know in the comments below.

spUtil API Reference Cheat Sheet

Overview spUtil enables you to perform common functions in a Service Portal widget client script. You can access the methods by passing in spUtil as a parameter in your client-script function. Many of these methods have not been documented by ServiceNow, so we have combed through the source code once again to bring you another Service Portal cheatsheet! Save time and maximize your productivity with this quick reference document for you to use day-to-day. Enjoy!

Top 5 Features in the Orlando Release

This year's Orlando release is full of great new functionality and updates to the ServiceNow platform. Needless to say, there were a ton of features to cover, so instead of compiling an enormous list, I've put together this video of my personal top 5 features. I bet at least a couple of these will surprise you! Check out the video. Let me know in the comments below if you agree or if you feel there is a big feature that should have made the list. The official release notes can be found here: https://docs.servicenow.com/bundle/orlando-release-notes/page/release-notes/family-release-notes.html

Lodash in Service Portal

Lodash in Service Portal There are a number of client-side libraries included in Service Portal. We will be going over some of them in this next series, starting with the Lodash library. The version of Lodash that is included in the Service Portal is 4.17.11. Please keep in mind that Lodash is only available client-side, so you can use it in your Client Script, but not in your Server Script. About Lodash Lodash is a JavaScript library that helps programmers write more concise and maintainable JavaScript and contains tools to simplify programming with strings, numbers, arrays, functions, and objects. You can find the full documentation here: https://lodash.com/docs Lodash can be broken down into several main areas: Utilities - for simplifying common programming tasks such as determining type as well as simplifying math operations. Function - simplifying binding, decorating, constraining, throttling, debouncing, currying, and changing the pointer. String - conversion functions for performing basic string operations, such as trimming, converting to uppercase, camel case, etc. Array - creating, splitting, combining, modifying, and compressing Collection - iterating, sorting, filtering, splitting, and building Object - accessing, extending, merging, defaults, and transforming Seq - chaining, wrapping, filtering, and testing. Some examples Lodash contains hundreds of helper functions. Although I can't go through all of them here, I have put together some common examples. OBJECTS _.clone(value) Creates a shallow clone of value. [crayon-5f99eebb62463472229162/] _.assign(object, [sources]) Assigns own enumerable string keyed properties of source objects to the destination object. Source objects are applied from left to right. Subsequent sources overwrite property assignments of previous sources. [crayon-5f99eebb6246f273393109/] ARRAYS _.times(n, [iteratee=_.identity]) Invokes the iteratee n times, returning an array of the results of each invocation. The iteratee is invoked with one argument; (index). [crayon-5f99eebb62475234638018/] _.uniq(array) Creates a duplicate-free version of an array, using SameValueZero for equality comparisons, in which only the first occurrence of each element is kept. The order of result values is determined by the order they occur in the array. [crayon-5f99eebb6247a952272578/] FUNCTIONS _.bind(func, thisArg, [partials]) [crayon-5f99eebb6247f043044036/] COLLECTION _.includes(collection, value, [fromIndex=0]) Checks if value is in collection. If collection is a string, it's checked for a substring of value, otherwise, SameValueZero is used for equality comparisons. If fromIndex is negative, it's used as the offset from the end of collection. [crayon-5f99eebb62485354821729/] _.filter(collection, [predicate=_.identity]) Iterates over elements of collection, returning an array of all elements predicate returns truthy for. The predicate is invoked with three arguments: (value, index|key, collection). [crayon-5f99eebb6248a735512398/] _.find(collection, [predicate=_.identity], [fromIndex=0]) Iterates over elements of collection, returning the first element predicate returns truthy for. The predicate is invoked with three arguments: (value, index|key, collection). [crayon-5f99eebb62490948951086/] SEQ _.chain(value) Creates a Lodash wrapper instance that wraps value with explicit method chain sequences enabled. The result of such sequences must be unwrapped with _#value. [crayon-5f99eebb62496829234706/] _.sortBy(collection, [iteratees=[_.identity]]) Creates an array of elements, sorted in ascending order by the results of running each element in a collection thru each iteratee. This method performs a stable sort, that is, it preserves the original sort order of equal elements. The iteratees are invoked with one argument: (value). [crayon-5f99eebb6249b509888734/] _.map(collection, [iteratee=_.identity]) Creates an array of values by running each element in collection thru iteratee. The iteratee is invoked with three arguments: (value, index|key, collection). [crayon-5f99eebb624a2068558367/] Conclusion Although some Lodash methods are becoming native JavaScript functions with ES6, there are still many useful methods that complement functional programming in Service Portal. For more on Lodash, check out the website: https://lodash.com For a Lodash cheatsheet, check out: https://devhints.io/lodash What other Lodash methods do you find useful in Service Portal? Let me know in the comments.

GlideSPScriptable Cheat Sheet

Overview Did you know there are over 60 server-side methods available in GlideSPScriptable ($sp)? Many of these methods are hidden or not documented, so we've combed through all the widgets and source code to provide you with this cheat sheet that includes all of the $sp methods available in Service Portal. Now updated for the New York release. Save time and maximize your productivity with this quick reference document for you to use day-to-day. Enjoy!

Service Catalog Item Wizard in Service Portal

We've had a number of clients ask about structuring catalog item forms as more of a "wizard" that only renders one section at a time. After thinking about it for a while, I realized that I could use the GlideForm API to programmatically hide and show the different sections (containers). So over the past couple of weeks, I've been working on a new widget that simply interacts with the out-of-box catalog item widget, and uses the API's to add all of the wizard-like capabilities. I think it turned out pretty cool, it's fully themeable, and best of all, it does not require cloning of any widgets. I still have a few more features to add, and I'm also considering adding an accompanying library of Variable Sets that provide a more graphical UI than the out-of-box catalog variables. If all goes well, I may end up including the widget in our RocketFuel library of widgets, so if you're interested in adding some wizard-like capabilities to your portal, feel free to contact me and we can schedule a demo. I'd love to hear what you guys think in the comments below. Is this a useful widget? Does this improve the user experience of the service catalog item form?

Restyling Notifications in Service Portal

Today I am going to show you how to change the styling of the built-in notifications in Service Portal. The default notifications in Service Portal are based on the Bootstrap Alerts components, but I prefer the smaller "Toast" notifications of Bootstrap 4. Default   New Style         The following CSS sets a new width and aligns the notifications in the upper right corner of the screen rather than spanning the whole page. You will need to add the following styles into a CSS Include in your theme. CSS [crayon-5f99eebb63893293929126/] If you are already on the Madrid release, I recommend replacing the above HEX colors with the $brand-success and $brand-danger variables so that they can be driven by the variables defined on your theme. If you wish to trigger notifications from your own widget, you can trigger notifications using either of the following. Server Side: gs.addInfoMessage("Success goes here"); gs.addErrorMessage("Error goes here"); Controller: spUtil.addInfoMessage("Success goes here"); spUtil.addErrorMessage("Error goes here");   BEFORE AFTER This is just a small example of how you can restyle the default notifications, but there is still plenty of ways this could be improved. If you have some ideas or other styles that you would like to share, feel free to post them in the comments below.

Localization in Service Portal

As most companies experience globalization in some capacity, it’s important that they localize their portals to accommodate users from different areas around the world. In this article, I will go through the different components involved with localizing your Service Portal. Before we begin, make sure to activate the internationalization (i18n) plugin and the required language pack plugins that will be used by your organization. Also, there is an OOB widget called "Language Switch." Simply include this widget somewhere in the portal to enable users to update their language preferences. The two primary tables in ServiceNow responsible for storing translations for Service Portal are: Message Translated Text We will also cover some of the other tables and plugins that can potentially impact translating a portal. Message table (sys_ui_message) The UI message table contains translations using key/value pairs. The key is the string in the base language and the value is the localized version of that string. The main fields on this table are: Key: unique identifier of this message (usually the English version of the string). Language: language the message is translated into. Message: translated text that users see. In Service Portal, the primary area you would see UI Messages used is inside widgets (in the HTML, Client Controller, and Server Script), but can also be commonly found in other areas with server-side scripts (e.g. Scripted Menu Items, Script Includes, etc.). HTML Use the ${} syntax in widgets to tag strings for translation [crayon-5f99eebb64943360795424/] If translating a string stored in a variable, it is also possible to wrap a data binding {{}} with ${} to translate the contents of the variable. [crayon-5f99eebb6494c270009550/] However, I do not recommend using this approach. It is much better to do the translations server-side whenever possible. Client Controller Similar to HTML, you can also use ${} in the controller if it's going to be displayed in the HTML [crayon-5f99eebb64951100009009/] Note: In some cases, the translation might have quotes or double quotes in it. That could lead to JavaScript errors if you are using the ${} syntax in the client script. The safest way to fetch a translated message is to do it in the server script. Another way, and perhaps better way to access translated strings in the controller is using the i18n service. [crayon-5f99eebb64956506800138/] In order to use the i18n service, you must also declare the variable in the HTML using the <now-message> syntax [crayon-5f99eebb6495b864946978/] And then you can render the message in HTML using the {{}} syntax [crayon-5f99eebb64960646858554/] Server Script For all server-side translations, use the gs.getMessage() method [crayon-5f99eebb64964316996990/] It is also possible to format certain template strings by passing in an array of strings as the second parameter: [crayon-5f99eebb64969997529962/] This would return: "Welcome Nathan Firth – you have 5 active tickets." Demo To demonstrate the various ways of doing translations using the sys_ui_message, here is a quick screen capture of the Widget Editor showing the string translated and used four different ways in the same widget. The string in all four cases is "Hello World", and I'm translating it to say "Hello There". Click image to see full size Translated Text table (sys_translated_text) The Translated Text table stores translations for fields with the field type translated_text or translated_html. The main fields for this table are: Document: internal identifier of the record this translation applies to. Field name: field this translated text appears in, for example, Close notes. Language: language the text is translated into. Table Name: table this translation applies to. Value: translated text that the user sees. Some common areas in Service Portal using Translated Text fields include: Widget Instances (title, short_description) Catalog Categories (title, description) Menu Items (label) Knowledge Categories (label) Other translation tables Although the Message and Translated Text are the primary tables used in Service Portal, there are also a few others worth noting: Knowledge (kb_knowledge) if you've activated the "com.glideapp.knowledge.i18n2" plugin, you can also translate articles directly using the Knowledge tables. Choice (sys_choice) table contains translated text for options that appear in choice lists. Field Label (sys_documentation) table stores the text of table names along with the singular and plural labels for each field in the table. Session at K19 Manually extracting, translating, and importing strings is time-consuming and error-prone. We will be leading a CreatorCon session at Knowledge19 in Las Vegas where we will be presenting on internationalization and making recommendations on to make this process less painful. Stay tuned for more information about that session. Lastly... We're working on a brand new scoped application that will automate the extratction and importing of translations for Service Portal. If you are interested in seeing a demo or would be interested in this upcoming application, please don't hesitate to reach out.